Metropolitan Swimming Hall of Fame
1999

2000

2001

Ruth & Jack Abramson Joe Bernal Etheida Bleibtry
Leo T Butler Tony Corbisiero Len Galluzzi
Rick Carey Charles M. Daniels Eleanor Holm
John Collins Gertrude Ederle Lea Loveless Maurer
Marie Giardini Louis DeBreda Hanley Martha Norelius
Robert "Bobby Hackett Marie Corridon Mortell Charles Schlegel
Lynn Burke McConville Fred Munsch Helen Wainwright
Lolita & Frank Ranhofer Sr. Frank Ranhofer Jr.
Anne & Joseph Stetz Sr. Alan Silverman
Carin Cone Vanderbush Charles Smith
Aileen Riggen Soule
2002

2003

2004

Charlotte Boyle Bill & Leona Davis Alicia Humphrey
Jess Brown Agnes Geraghty Richard "Dick" Krempecki
Charlotte Epstein Dr. Jane Katz
Peter Fick Ed Kennedy
Drury Gallagher George Kojac
Walter Spence Jack Ryan
John Witchell
2005

2006

2007

Ray D'Annolfo Charles "Chuck" Felice Hazel Barr
Ray Ruddy Jessica Foschi Tobie Smith
Cristina Teuscher Mary Ann Senecal
2008

2009

2012

Woody Davis Bill Irwin Monique Grayson
Francis X. Gorman Sue Peterson Lubow Barry Roffer
Bea Hartigan Gerson Sobel
Elsie Viets Jennings
2013

   
Julia Smit
Kip Fierro
Donatello Galluzzi
John Santos
 
Hazel Barr

Diver / Coach / Administrator - Flushing YMCA
Women's Swimming Association (WSA)
Inducted in 2007
Metro Diving Champion and Coach of High School, Junior National, and Collegiate Diving Champions. Member of the US Diving Committee. Ran diving in Metro for over 30 years. Member of the NYC Public School Athletic League Hall of Fame.
 
Etheida Bleibtry

Swimmer
Inducted in 2001
1967 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD: OLYMPIC GAMES: 1920 gold (100m, 300m freestyle; 4x100m freestyle relay); WORLD RECORDS: freestyle, backstroke; NATIONAL AAU CHAMPIONSHIPS: between 1920 and 1922 won every national championship from 50yd to 1 mile; turned professional in 1922 after an undefeated amateur career.
Ethelda Bleibtrey was the USA's first female Olympic swimming champion and the only person ever to win all the women's swimming events at any Olympic Games.  She took up competitive swimming for the first time in 1918, won the nationals within a year, and was the best in the world by the end of the second year (1920 Olympics).
Miss Bleibtrey won 3 gold medals in the Games at Antwerp and says only fate kept her from being swimming's first 4 gold medal winner in one Olympic Game, an honor Hall of Famer Don Schollander accomplished 44 years later in Tokyo.   "At that time," she says, "I was the world record holder in backstroke but they didn't have women's backstroke, only freestyle in those Olympics."
For her world and Olympic records in the 100 and 300 meter freestyle and anchor leg of the winning U.S. 400 freestyle relay, Ethelda was congratulated by King Albert of Belgium.  She later surfed with the Prince of Wales in Hawaii, dated oarsman Jack Kelly in Atlantic City, and triumphantly toured the Panama Canal, Australia and New Zealand.  The invitation down under came when she was the first girl ever to beat Hall of Famer Fanny Durack, the long-time Australian multi-world record holder on Fanny's U.S. tour in 1919.
Miss Bleibtrey had several other firsts for which she got citations but no medals.  Her first citation was for "nude swimming" at Manhattan Beach.  She removed her stockings before going in to swim.  This was considered nudity in 1919.  Resulting publicity and public opinion swinging in her favor not only emancipated Ethelda from jail, but women's swimming from stockings.  On her trip to Australia with Charlotte Boyle the misses Bleibtrey and Boyle were the second and third famous women to bob their hair -- something Irene Castle had just introduced.  Charlotte's parents told them not to come home until it grew out (citation #2), for which they were reprieved when the ship landed and the Boyle's decided it didn't look as bad as they had feared.  Citation #3 got Ethelda arrested in Central Park and paddy-wagonned down to the New York police station for a night in jail but it also got New York its first big swimming pool in Central Park after Mayor Jimmy Walker intervened.
It happened like this:  "The New York Daily News" wanted the City to open up its Central Park reservoir for swimming and arranged to have Ethelda arrested while diving in.  For this they paid her $1,000.00, money she sorely needed after an abortive attempt to turn pro with a tank tour of the Keith Circuit.  Her tank leaked -- all over the theater -- and Keith's sued her instead of continuing her promised 14 week tour.
Ethelda Bleibtrey, who started swimming because of polio, and took it up seriously to keep her friend Charlotte Boyle company, turned pro in 1922 after winning every national AAU championship from 50 yards to long distance (1920-1922) in an undefeated amateur career.  She also started the U.S. Olympians Association with Jack Kelly, Sr., and later became a successful coach and swimming teacher in New York and Atlantic City.  She is currently a practicing nurse in North Palm Beach, Florida -- not as young but just as interesting.  The sparkle remains in her eyes as she tells how they swam their 1920 Olympic races "in mud and not water," in a tidal estuary; and how she participated in the first athletic sit-in when Hall of Famer Norman Ross organized the Olympic team to sit it out on the beach in Europe until the U.S. Olympic Committee sent better accommodations for the voyage home.  "I have my memories," says Ethelda, "and I guess some of those other people remember too.  I owe a great deal to swimming and to Charlotte Boyle, who got me in swimming and L. deB. Handley, who coached me to the top."
 
Charlotte Boyle

Swimmer
Women's Swimming Association (WSA)
Inducted in 2002
1988 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Pioneer Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD: WORLD RECORDS: 2 (200m, 220 yd freestyle); U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: 8 (50yd to 5 mile long distance). Competed in 1910's and 1920's. First great freestyle swimmer of the dominant New York Women's Swimming Association.
Charlotte Boyle set two world records and won eight U.S. National Championships on both sides of the 1920 Olympics.  Charlotte Boyle was the first great freestyler of the dominant New York Women's Swimming Association and coach L. de B. Handley, the first U.S. scientific swimming coach.  Her style and glamour added to a large dose of talent, helped to popularize competitive women's swimming. She concluded her career with a story book marriage and a long life of service, teaching thousands to swim.  Her own competitive career included winning nationals from 50 yards to the five mile national long distance.  Her world records were in the 200 meter and 220 yard middle distance events.
 
Jess Brown

Coach / Administrator - Flushing YMCA
Inducted in 2002
Founder of first age group program in Metro. Coached flushing for 12 years. Started the NY City Y Swim League and monthly swim meets at Flushing. Helped organize NY State Y Championships. Also started diving and synchronized swimming. Made the Flushing Y available for Senior Met Championships, other aquatic programs, and provided meeting space for Metro.
 
Rick Carey

Swimmer - Badger Swim Club
Inducted in 1999
1993 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD: 9 WORLD RECORDS: 100m backstroke (3), 200m backstroke (2), 400m medley relay (4); OLYMPIC GAMES: 1984 gold (100m backstroke, 200m backstroke, 400m medley relay); WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: 1982 gold (200m backstroke, 400m medley relay), silver (100m backstroke); PAN AMERICAN GAMES: 1983 gold (100m backstroke, 200m backstroke, 400m medley relay).
During a sixteen year period from 1967-1983, only three men held the world 100-meter backstroke record: Hall of Famers Roland Matthes, John Naber and Rick Carey.  A five-time world record holder in the 100 and 200 meter backstroke and the 400 meter medley relay.
A native of Mt. Kisco, New York, Rick Carey was the exception to the rule among the majority of American swimmers--he never left home for the bluer waters of the West Coast or the balmy weather in Florida after reaching the national level. Rather, Carey chose to remain with the Badger Swim Club in Larchmont, New York, where he first began swimming at age 12 under the tutelage of Coach John Collins.
A natural swimmer, Carey set the first of his many national backstroke records beginning in 1977, just two years after joining his local swim club.  Although Carey made the 1980 Olympic team, it wasn't until 1981 that his career sky-rocketed.  That year, he not only captured his first national titles in the 100 and 200 meter backstroke, but he also established his first American record in the 200 backstroke.
That same year, Carey began his college career at the University of Texas under coach Eddie Reese.  At Texas, Carey won three consecutive NCAA 200 yard backstroke championships (1982-1984) and two 100 yard backstroke championships (1983-1984).
Of all Carey's record performances, perhaps his biggest claim to fame is that he is the man who broke John Naber's 1976 world backstroke records in 1983.  That same year, at the Pan American Games in Caracas, Venezuela, Carey swam on the world record breaking 400 meter medley relay team which consisted of four current world record holders--Rick Carey (backstroke), Steve Lundquist (breaststroke), Matt Gribble (butterfly) and Rowdy Gaines (freestyle).
 
John Collins

Coach - Badger Swim Club
Inducted in 1999
Started coaching Badger in 1970, head coach 1972 – present; head coach Manhattanville College 1973-1993; 1989 Junior National Head Coach; 1995 Pan American Games Women’s Head Coach; 1997 Pan Pacific Championships Women’s Head Coach; 1998 Goodwill Games Women’s Assistant Coach; 1998 World Championships Women’s Assistant Coach;1999 Pan Pacific Championships Women’s Assistant Coach; coached Rick Carey to multiple World Records, Olympic Gold Medals, World Championship and Pan American Games Gold and Silver Medals.
1983 American Swimming Coaches Association Coach of the Year: swam for Indiana University from 1964-67 and was an All-American; broke the American record 200 long course yards in 1964; swan on the 1966 U.S. National Team competing at the Little Olympics in Mexico City.
 
Charles M Daniels

Swimmer
Inducted in 2000
1965 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD:  OLYMPIC GAMES: 1904 gold (220 yd, 440yd freestyle; 4x50yd freestyle relay), silver (100yd freestyle), bronze (50yd freestyle), 4th (100yd backstroke); 1906 gold (100m freestyle), 4th (4x250m freestyle relay); 1908 gold (100m freestyle), bronze (4x200m freestyle); WORLD RECORDS:  during his career, held every world freestyle record, from 25yd to 1 mile; U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: 33; North American Athlete of the Year: 1909.
Born March 24, 1885, the late C. M. "Charlie" Daniels was the first great American swimmer and the world's greatest swimmer from 1904 until his retirement in 1910 with four Olympic gold medals and 33 U.S. national championships.  He was premier swimmer at the New York Athletic Club where he was also squash and bridge champion.
Daniels was picked as the North American athlete of the year for 1909 by the Helms Hall athletic board.  He is credited as the one who evolved the American crawl from the two-beat Australian crawl and the man who gave freestyle speed swimming its greatest impetus since the beginning of modern competitive swimming in 1838 in England.
Prior to the advent of Daniels, the American record for 100 yards was much slower than the English record and as late as 1905, the American record was 2.4 tenths slower than the world's record of 57.6.  From that date on the record for that distance, thanks principally to Daniels' revolutionary technique, has been held by an American.
March 23, 1906, Daniels reduced his world record to 56.0--cut to 55.4 on September 7, 1907-- and to 54.8 on April 7, 1910.
Daniels continued to dominate the realm of freestyle swimming until his retirement in 1910.  He was the first American to win an Olympic Games swimming event, winning both the 220 yard and 440 yard events at the 1904 St. Louis Games--the 100 meter at the 1906 Games in Athens, Greece--and the 100 meter at the 1908 London Olympics.
During his career, Daniels held every world freestyle record, from 25 yards to the mile and his 33 national championships were over all distances on the indoor and outdoor program.
Daniels more than any other swimmer brought the United States into the picture as a world swimming power.  His first two visits to England mad believers in the country where modern swimming evolved and was headquartered.
 
Ray D'Annolfo

Coach / Administrator
Inducted in 2005
Assistant Coach Huntington YMCA 1972-1979; Head Coach Connetquot Swim Club 1979-1984; Head Coach Half Hollow Hills Swim Club 1098-1990; Head Coach Hauppauge Aquatic Association Swim Club 1990-1992; Co-Head Coach Half Hollow Hills Swim Club 1992-2004; coached multiple Top 16 swimmers, Junior National Qualifiers, Senior National Qualifiers, and Olympic Trials Qualifiers; served on the Metropolitan Board as Senior Chair, Safety Chair, General Chair, and Review Section Chair totaling some 22 years.
 
Bill & Leona Davis

Coaches / Administrators - Long Island Swim Club
Inducted in 2003
The preeminent age group coaches in Metro during the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s. their swimmers consistently qualified for National Championships and were ranked National Age Group Top times. Their athletes still hold some Metro Age Group Records more than a decade after their retirement. Leona served on the Metro Board during both AAU and USS years. Bill was involved in technical planning work.
 
Woody Davis

Coach / Administrator - Long Beach Swim Club and Long Beach High School
Inducted in 2008
Has coached more than 4 decades of HS swimming with numerous Nassau Champions and state qualifiers. During the AAU and early USS years he coached Long Beach Swim Club were he had many nationally ranked swimmers. Many of his former athletes have gone on to successful careers as collegiate swimmers and HS and collegiate coaches. Has run HS Section 8 Championships for many years.
 
Gertrude Ederle

Swimmer
Inducted in 2000
1965 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD:  OLYMPIC GAMES: 1924 gold (4x100m freestyle relay), bronze (100m, 400m freestyle); WORLD and NATIONAL RECORDS: 29 (from 1921 to 1925 - in 1922 she set 7 world records in the course of one 500m swim); First woman to swim the English Channel, 1926 (beating all previous times by men).
Gertrude Ederle's two greatest days in swimming were at Brighton Beach in 1922 and in the English Channel in 1926, the first as an amateur, the second as a professional.
At Brighton Beach, Miss Ederle broke 7 world records at various distances in the course of a single 500 meter swim.  In England, she became the first woman to swim the English Channel.
Trudy's great Channel swim was 51 years after Matthew Webb, the first man to swim the Channel, had achieved the impossible, and it completely captured the public imagination because such swimming immortals as Annette Kellerman had tried and failed, claiming the feat completely beyond the limits of a woman's strength and endurance.  Gertrude Ederle not only swam the Channel but swam it faster than any man before her.
She held 29 U.S. national and world records from 1921 until she turned professional after the 1925 season.  Her amateur national championships were won at distances from 50 yards to the half mile and her great professional Channel effort was 20 miles.  Olympian Ederle was tough at any distance at the 1924 Paris Olympics.
Gertrude Ederle was the female counterpart of Johnny Weissmuller in that they were discussed in every household as the two greatest swimming figures of the 1920s, idols of the "Golden Age of Sport".
 
Charlotte Epstein

Administrator
Women's Swimming Association (WSA)
Inducted in 2002
1974 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Contributor
FOR THE RECORD:  OLYMPIC GAMES: 1932 U.S. Women's Olympic Swim Team  (Assistant Manager); Organizer and administrator of New York Women's Swimming Association (WSA); During her 22 years with the WSA, her swimmers held 51 world records,  202 individual AAU Women's National Senior Championships in swimming and diving; 30 National championship relay teams, Olympic medals in swimming and diving.
The story of Charlotte Epstein is the history of U.S. women's Swimming until the time of her death in 1938.  "Eppy", as her long curvy line-up of women's swim champions called her, started the famed WSA (Women's Swimming Association) in New York City.  She was the organizer, the manager, the continuity and the tenacity that made it go and kept it going.  Charlotte Epstein, a court reporter by profession, worked behind the scenes on her swimming hobby. Her name and face were seldom in public print.  She was assistant manager of the 1932 U.S. Women's Olympic Swim Team, the first woman to be named for such an honor, but her principal contribution to U.S. and World Swimming is the record of her club and her swimmers. In 1916 the first AAU Women's National Champion Hall of Famer Claire Galligan was an "Eppy" swimmer at WSA.  So were the girls who won 201 other individual AAU Women's National Senior Championships in swimming and diving--all this in an era when there were fewer events in the Nationals.
Eppy's success could be attributed to her swimmers and to L. de B. Handley, her volunteer coach.  Her success as an administrator was her ability to bring so many champions together and keep them swimming.  She would have been the first to pass the credit on to Elsie Veitts Jennings, her more diplomatic protégé, to Coach "Lou" Handley, and to her all-star honor roll of Olympic and National Champions.  Her girls held 51 world records yet they were first, last, and always team swimmers, as their competition would attest with envy.  WSA put together 30 national champion relay teams during Eppy's 22 years with Women's Swimming Association.  Only WSA won the women's national long distance team title for the first 13 years of the competition.  Even Olympic divers swam on relays, and twice Aileen Riggin and Helen Wainwright achieved Olympic medals in both swimming and diving.  No other women swimmers before or since have attained world class excellence to this degree of versatility.  And any coach's girl who wanted to try her luck in a National against WSA swimmers had better be tough because Eppy gave no quarter.  Always it was the results, not her personal glory, that mattered to Charlotte Epstein.
 
Charles "Chuck" Felice

Swimmer - Badger, Gator, and Fordham University
Inducted in 2006
Swimming career spanned the late 1960’s and early 1970’s Top ranked AAU swimmer in both Metro and National level as Age Group and Senior swimming. Qualified, competed, and scored at AAU National and NCAA Championships. Arguably Metro’s most outstanding male swimmer from 1970-75.
 
Peter Fick

Swimmer - NYAC
Inducted in 2002
1978 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD:  OLYMPIC GAMES: 5th (100m freestyle); WORLD RECORDS: 5; AMERICAN RECORDS: 9; NATIONAL AAU Titles: 13. 
It was Peter Fick who finally caught up and tied Johnny Weissmuller's World Record 51 seconds 100 yard freestyle in 1936.  He twice broke Weissmuller's 100m freestyle mark in 1934 and 1936.  Fick's career was a swashbuckling epic in American Swimming.  Like all great epics, it had drama with laughs almost as frequent as his many victories, and in the 1936 Olympics, a tragedy where photos showed him second and the judges ruled him fifth. His curse to bear is that World War II left him no chance of redemption or revenge.  The 1940 Games in which he was favored to win were twice cancelled, first in Tokyo and then in Helsinki.
 
Kip Fierro

Coach / Swimmer
Inducted in 2013
Assistant Swim Coach Badger Swim Club; former Metro Administrator; former Metro Age Group Coach of the Year; 3-time Westchester County Coach of the Year; coached 50 Top 100 All Time USA age group swimmers; coached over 100 Eastern Zone Championship qualifiers; invited to USA Swimming's National Age Group Summit for the top age group programs in the country; coached over 50 swimmers that have achieved Top 16 times; coached several NYS High School Champions and Metro Record Holders.
As a swimmer: NYS Champion in the 200 IM; a National Junior Olympic Championships, Region 1 Championships, a Region 1, 2, 3 Championship qualifier; recruited and attended the University of Miami; broke 1:00.0 in the 100 Breast in three decades.
 
Donatello Galluzzi

Swimmer / Official / Coach / Volunteer
Inducted in 2013
AAU & USS member for 58 years, Metro member for 54 years…Coach - Flushing Y - 2 State Championships, Newark Academy - coached HS All-American; Columbia University - Coached World and American Record holder Tony Corbisiero as well as NCAA qualifiers, winning Senior Met Champs. several times.
Also coached at - Ohio University, Fordham University, Stevens Institute of Technology, Fairfield University, Yale University, compiling a .676 winning percentage and 14 conference championships and being recognized 20 times as Academic All-Americans. Don has National certification as a starter and referee...Wrote and administered Asphalt Green Team Mission Plan and was a member of the Metro Tech planning committee. He made available Columbia and Fordham pools for Metro meets!
 
Drury Gallagher

Masters Swimmer
Inducted in 2002
Currently holder of 6 World and 29 USMS Records. Has 71 number 1 and 124 top ten rankings since 1993. Named All-American in 19 years from 1979 to present.
 
Agnes Geraghty

Swimmer
Women's Swimming Association (WSA)
Inducted in 2003
Member of the 1924 and 1928 US Olympic Team. Silver Medal 200 Breast. Nine time National Champion.
 
Francis X. Gorman

Diver
Inducted in 2008
1964 Olympic Silver Medalist in the 3-meter Springboard event A graduate of Bayside HS and Harvard University where he was a 2 time ECAC Champion. Gorman is a member of the PSAL and Harvard University Athletic Hall of Fame.
 
Monique G Grayson

Volunteer / Administrator
Inducted in 2012
Administrator Boys & Girls Club of Northern Westchester for 28+ years; Metro Board Secretary for 20+ years; Northern Westchester Swim Conference volunteer for over 25 years; Swim Meet computer operator for Senior Metropolitan Championships and Junior Olympics for over 20 years; Metropolitan Swimming representative to USA Swimming for over 20 years; Metro Representative to Eastern Zone Committee for over 20 years; Technical Planning Committee for over 18 years; "ConocoPhillips Outstanding Service Award". National Times Verification Officer for the USA Swimming SWIMS Database (formerly OVC) for over 15 years.
Team Parent representative for Briarcliff Manor Recreation summer league for over 15 years and for the Terrapins Swim Team at the University of Maryland - College Park - (1995-1999); Recording Secretary for Metropolitan Swimming, Northern Westchester Swim Conference and Westchester County Swimming Association. Web Master for BGNW Marlins Swim Team, NWSC and WCSA. Swim Meet Computer Coordinator for Section One High School Championships since 1991.
 
Robert "Bobby" Hackett

Swimmer - Gator Swim Club & Harvard University
Inducted in 1999
Began swimming at the Linden Street Pool in Yonkers and swam for the JCC and White Plains YMCA where he set 3 Metro J.O. records. At age 12 he joined Bernal’s Gator Swim Club and set 10 new Metro age group records and represented Metro at the Region I National Jr. Olympics. At age 14, Bobby set 16 more Metro age group records and qualified for the AAU Short Course and Long Course Nationals where he broke 8 National age group records and was named Top Age Group Male Swimmer in the U.S.
At age 15, Bobby won the 1500m free at Nationals qualifying him for the Pan American Games in Mexico where he won gold in the 1500m breaking the Pan Am record by 40 seconds and silver in the 400m. In 1976 at the Olympic Trials, Bobby broke the existing 800m free World Record on his way out in the 1500m free. At the Montreal Olympics he won the Silver Medal in the 1500m. In the 1978 World Championships, Bobby won a gold and silver and was a member of the World Record breaking 4X200m Free Relay. Bobby attended Harvard University where he earned 12 All-American rankings and was awarded the William J. Brigham Award which is one of the highest distinctions the University awards.
 
Louis deBreda Hanley

Coach
Women's Swimming Association (WSA)
Inducted in 2002
1967 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Coach
FOR THE RECORD: OLYMPIC GAMES: 1904 gold (water polo, 4x50yd freestyle relay); 1920 (First U.S. Women's Olympic Coach); Coach of New York Women's Swimming Association with a swimmer on every Olympic team from 1920-1936; AAU NATIONAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR WATER POLO CHAMPIONSHIPS: on team which won 13 out of 14 championships (1898 to 1911); held position of volunteer coach with the Women's Swimming Association from 1917 until his death in 1952; Swimming journalist; published five books on swimming and wrote the swimming section for the Encyclopedia Britannica.
With all due respect to the excellent coaching of Charlotte Epstein and the organizational skills of Elsie Viet Jennings, the guiding genius in the golden era of the New York Women's Swimming Association was a volunteer swimming coach, the late Louis deBreda Handley--known to his friends as "Lou" and to his swimmers as "L. deB.".  For so long as L. deB. Handley coached, WSA dominated both U.S. and World women's swimming.
Three of his swimmers--Ethelda Bleibtrey, Martha Norelius and Aileen Riggin-- are being honored with him as 1967 Swimming Hall of Fame honorees.  Two others--Gertrude Ederle and Eleanor Holm--have already been honored in 1965 and 1966.  Certainly "L. deB." must rate as the father of U.S. women's swimming.  He was the first women's Olympic coach in 1924 and his Women's Swimming Association girls, Charlotte Boyle, Helen Meany, Helen Wainwright, Ethel McGary, Lisa Lidtrom, Agnes Geraghety, to name a few, dominated between world wars as even Santa Clara cannot dominate today.
L. deB.'s genius did not rest with champions alone.  He must be rated the first and foremost swimming journalist.  No other writer ever has been bylined in the "Times", "Tribune", World and American at the same time.  He published five books on swimming and wrote the swimming section for the Encyclopedia Britannica.  L. deB. must rate as the foremost scholar in developing the freestyle flutter kick.  When coaches thought 4 beat the limit, especially with girls, his girls went to 6, 8, and even 10 beat kicks.  Swim "experts" throughout the world said his Gertrude Ederle would never make the Channel with her 8 beat crawl kick.  She did, the first woman to make it, and in time 2 hours faster than any man had done.
The dominant U.S. women's swimmers from the 1920 Olympics to the 1936 Olympics credit "L. deB." as their coach, but few know what a world-renowned athlete he was before he turned to coaching.  Born in Rome in 1874, he came to New York in 1896 as an importer and joined the Knickerbocker A. C., then the New York A. C., where he competed successfully in football, as an oarsman, water polo player, yachtsman, and swimmer.  In the 1904 St. Louis Olympics, he won gold medals in both water polo and relay swimming as a member of the winning U.S. teams.  From 1898 to 1911, L. deB. helped to win all but one of the AAU National Indoor and Outdoor Water Polo Championships.  When the murderous American softball water polo was retired in 1911 in favor of international rules, the 39 year old Handley retired with it, taking up yachting and field dog-training with new enthusiasm.
Modern pentathlon advocates might be interested in a tarnished silver cup on display at the Swimming Hall of Fame.  It is engraved: "To L. deB. Handley as the world record holder of the 'medley race'", which consisted of continuous quarter miles of walking, running, horseback riding, bicycle, rowing and swimming, in that order.  His time was 16:27 4/5, defeating Joe Ruddy, another fabulous name in the era.
 
Bea Hartigan

Coach / Administrator - Huntington Y
Inducted in 2008
Became an official and then mentored new officials. General Chair 5 years, Vice-Chair,
Finance Chair, Officials Chair, Adapted Swimming Chair, Open Water Chair for Metro. Served on Review and Hall of Fame Committees in Metro. Represented Metro at Eastern Zone and National Convention. At the National Level, served on Adapted Committee and as Coordinator for American Records of Swimmers with Disabilities. Race Director for Open Water swims including 2000 National 10K championships. Meet Referee for International Games for the Disabled in 1984.
 
Eleanor Holm

Swimmer
Inducted in 2001
1966 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD: OLYMPIC GAMES: 1928 5th (100m backstroke); 1932 gold (100m backstroke); 1936 (removed from U.S. Olympic team during trip to Berlin); U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: 29 (individual medley; 100yd, 220yd backstroke); Performed professionally at 1939 and 1940 New York World's Fairs.
Eleanor Holm was the star backstroker from the New York Women's Swimming Association.  She was the 15-year-old baby of the 1928 Olympic team, was a gold medal winner in 1932, and was the Grand Dame of the 1936 Games, a married woman and expected to win until she was kicked off the team for sipping champagne with the officials on shipboard.
Eleanor was swimming her career and world best times when disqualified in 1936.  She says she could go even faster after six shows a day at the 1939 and 1940 New York World's Fair where she starred opposite Hall of Famers Johnny Weissmuller and Buster Crabbe.
Eleanor showed her swimming versatility early by winning nine national golds in the individual medley beginning in 1927.  Katherine Rawls caught up with Eleanor as queen of the individual medley, but Katherine says she or no one else could catch Eleanor on her backstroke, where she held six World Records.  Her 100 yard backstroke times held up 16 years in the U.S. and her 200 yard back times even longer, although less frequently swum.  All totaled, Miss Holm won 29 National Championships before turning pro to be in the movies.
Not only did she have the glamour for show business, but also the speed and the record of many years as a top amateur swimmer.  In 1937, she was signed to star in the Billy Rose Aquacades where she married the boss. "The Aquacade was my idea," she says, "but the marriage was his."
 
Bill Irwin

Swimmer / Coach - NYAC, Adelphi University, & Manhassett Swim Club
Inducted in 2009
ECAC Champion and All-American at Rutgers University. National Championship qualifier. Coach of NCAA div. II All-Americans at Adelphi in the 60’s and 70’s. As a coach of Manhassett SC he had several Metro ASU Outstanding Swimmers. He became a nationally ranked masters swimmer and All-American. Has coached Masters swimmers on Long Island and in Virginia.
 
Dr. Jane Katz

Swimmer / Contributor
Inducted in 2003
FINA Certificate of Merit 2000. Member of the 1964 US Olympic Synchronized Performance Team. Author of 9 books and numerous articles. Member of all Maccabiah Teams since 1957 as a competitor, masters competitor, and coach. Has 92 number 1 and over 400 top ten national rankings since 1974. Named All-American31 times since 1974. 4 World Masters Records and 40 US Masters Records in 4 age groups. Junior National AAU 800m Champion.
 
Ed Kennedy

Coach / Official / Administrator
Inducted in 2003
1966 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Contributor
FOR THE RECORD: Columbia University swimming and water polo coach from 1910-1955; U.S. Olympic Men's Swim Team Manager (1936, 1952);  Editor of NCAA Swimming Guide (10 years);  Chairman of NCAA Rules Committee (8 years); First recipient of the Intercollegiate-Interscholastic swimming award (1958).
Edward T. Kennedy, long-reigning Chairman of the unique Fort Lauderdale Christmas Swim Forum, was the swimming and water polo coach at Columbia University from 1910 until mandatory retirement in 1955.  For 15 years since, he resented the retirement and was more active than any Emeritus on record.  As with his long-time friend, Matt Mann, Ed Kennedy just isn't retirement material.
He started as a professional baseball player in New England and learned swimming at the famous Brookline (Mass.) Baths, that also gave us swimming Olympic coaches Matt Mann and Bob Muir.  Kennedy went on to manage the 1936 and 1952 U.S. Men's Olympic swim teams.
He has been the best known U.S. swimming starter for 45 years.  He was Editor of the NCAA Swimming Guide for 10 years, Chairman of the Rules Committee for 8 years, and first recipient of the Intercollegiate-Interscholastic Swimming Award in 1958.  His name is at the top of this handsome sculptured trophy in the entrance to the International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) that he helped found in 1965 and presided over as second President in 1969.
While Kennedy is best known for his administrative, executive and managerial swimming ability in later life, he put the same energy into a successful coaching career that produced such collegiate and AAU successes as Herb Vollmer and Gene Rogers. Kennedy has played a key role in upgrading coaches in the administrative hierarchy of amateur sports.
 
George Kojac

Swimmer - NYAC
Inducted in 2002
1968 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD: OLYMPIC GAMES: 1928 gold (100m backstroke; 4x200m freestyle relay), 4th (100m freestyle); WORLD RECORDS: 23; NATIONAL SCHOLASTIC CHAMPIONSHIPS (freestyle; backstroke); NCAA and NAAU CHAMPIONSHIPS: 1927-1931 (backstroke; freestyle), undefeated; EUROPEAN TOUR: won 32 races. METROPOLITAN AAU CHAMPIONSHIPS: 1939 gold.
George Harold Kojac was born in New York City in 1910.  He broke his first world record as a senior in DeWitt Clinton High School in swimming the 50 yd. backstroke in 29 seconds flat.  He broke every National Scholastic freestyle and backstroke record, then won NCAA and NAAU backstroke and freestyle national championships from 1927 to 1931.  In the 1928 Olympic Games, Kojac won two gold medals; the 100 meter backstroke (1:08.2) and as a member of the winning 800 meter freestyle relay.  Kojac was also fourth in the 100 meter freestyle showing again that his prowess as a freestyler was world class, if not world champion, as was his backstroke.
Unfortunately for swimming, Kojac graduating from Rutgers in 1931, was too preoccupied with Columbia Medical School to try for Olympic glory in 1932.  Kojac never lost a college swimming race while representing Rutgers.  He set and held a total of 23 world records, beat Johnny Weissmuller's 150 yd. backstroke record while still in high school.  On European tour, Kojac won 32 races, beating Hans Schwartz, the German champion, fifteen times.  He learned to swim in the East River while watching his brothers' clothes as they swam.  Son of Ukrainian immigrants, perhaps the greatest Ukrainian swimmer ever, Kojac first swam competitively with the Boy's Club, later joined the NYAC when not at Rutgers where he worked his way through school, finishing fifth in a class of 160.  Ironically, Kojac's decision not to swim in 1932 gave Japan a 2, 2, 3 Olympic sweep at New Orleans with the gold medal time slower than Kojac's 1928 Olympic record.
In the words of his contemporaries, Johnny Weissmuller and Buster Crabbe, the Hall of Fame needs George Kojac, one of the greatest.  Just for kicks, George Kojac came out of retirement 10 years after his glory days and won the 1939 Metropolitan AAU championships.
 
Richard "Dick" Krempecki

Coach St. John's University
Inducted in 2004
Head coach of St. John’s University Swimming Team from 1964-1985; presented the Master Coach Award form the College Swimming Coaches Association in 1970; president of the Metropolitan Swimming Conference from 1965-1968; during his tenure, Krempecki amassed a 72% winning record.
 
Sue Peterson Lubow

Swimmer / Coach / Contributor - US Merchant Marine Academy
Inducted in 2009
Swam for the Long Island Swim Club and Springfield College where she was an NCAA Division III All-American. First woman to Coach a Men’s Team at a US Federal Academy when she took over coaching duties in 1979. Compiled a record of 148-67 in 11 years. Coached 48 All-Americans and 2 Division III NCAA Champions. In 1991, was the first woman to be named Athletic Director at a US Federal Academy. Member of the NCAA Swimming & Diving Rules Committee. Served as an assistant manager and manager of several US National Swim Teams including the 1995 Pan Pacific Games and the 1998 World Championships.
 
Lea Loveless Maurer

Swimmer
Inducted in 2001
1992 Olympics Bronze Medal 100m Backstroke and Gold Medal 400 Medley Relay with an American record split; held the American record in the 100m Backstroke for 6 years; medaled in both the 1993 and 1997 Pan Pacific Championships; medaled in the 1994 and 1998 World Championships; won a Gold medal and a Silver medal at the 1998 Goodwill Games; 8 time US National Champion and American record holder in both the 100yd and 100m Backstroke; a member of the US National Team for 12 years.
 
Lynn Burke McConville

Swimmer
Inducted in 1999
1978 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD:  OLYMPIC GAMES: 1960 gold (100m backstroke; 400m medley relay); WORLD RECORDS: 6; NATIONAL AAU titles: 6 (100m backstroke, 2 relays); AMERICAN RECORDS: 7; Lowered the 100m backstroke World Record four times within three months.
The significant point about Lynn Burke's backstroke World and Olympic Records, according to her coach, George Haines, "is a big chunk she took out of the current world class backstrokers' time, dropping two seconds in the 100m backstroke."  She was the first American woman to win the Olympic 100m backstroke in 28 years.  Lynn burst across the horizon like a flying fish going from virtual obscurity to the best in the world in less than two years, not only defeating all contemporaries, but finally wiping out the oldest record in the books, Hall of Famer Cor Kint's 1939 record that had lasted 21 years.  A New York model, author, business woman, and working mother of three children, Lynn Burke is glamorous proof that a swimmer can set records in more than the water.
 
Marie Corridon Mortell

Swimmer
Women's Swimming Association (WSA)
Inducted in 2000
First woman to break one minute in the 100 yard freestyle. On the 1948 and 1952 Olympic team. In 1948, she won a gold medal in the 4 x 100 freestyle relay and helped set a new world record.
 
Martha Norelius

Swimmer
Inducted in 2001
1967 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD: OLYMPIC GAMES: 1924 gold (400m freestyle); 1928 gold (400m freestyle; 4x100m freestyle relay); WORLD RECORDS: 29 in summer of 1927.
Martha Norelius was our first woman swimmer to win gold medals in two different Olympics, 1924 when she was 15, and 1928.  During one summer, 1927, the same year Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic, Martha Norelius set 29 world swimming records, 13 more than Johnny Weissmuller set that summer.  Her swimming career did not span the Atlantic, as did Lindbergh, but that's about all it didn't span in winning freestyle races from 50s to marathons.
Swedish born, U.S. raised, Martha's coaches were her father, who swam for Sweden in the 1906 Olympic Games, and Hall of Famer L. deB. Handley, who coached the U.S. 1924 Olympic team on which Martha, his brightest star, beat hall of Famer Gertrude Ederle and won the 400 meter freestyle, a title she won again in the 1928 Games.
Martha Norelius took on all comers in a great career from 1922 to 1929, turned pro after the AAU suspended her for giving a Miami exhibition in the same pool with professionals.  As a pro, she won the $10,000 ten-mile Wrigley Marathon in Toronto, where she met and married Canada's best rower, Joe Wright, also an Olympic champion.
Martha was considered the first woman to swim with and like the men.  She used Johnny Weissmuller's high head position, arched back and a heavy 6-beat kick, hydroplaning over the water.  Her father trained her to see how few strokes she could swim a length of the pool in--39 or 40 strokes a minute, then speed it up for competition.  She stayed with her competition for 3/4 of a race, then went by.  In the marathons, she used the same high elbow, long glide arm stroke but almost no kick.  Norelius was the world's fastest woman swimmer for 8 years and at any distance.  She got more publicity than any girl swimmer before or since, perhaps because she trained in her father's pools at the Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs and the Breakers in Palm Beach, where she was the darling of the social set.
Martha Norelius always wore a cap, thought she couldn't swim without it, was left putting it on as the gun went off  for a national 500, but won anyway.  "She knew she had plenty of time," says her 87-year-old father, who quit coaching in 1966 when he broke his hip falling from a handstand.  Charles Norelius coached a record 63 years, retired 12 years after his famous daughter died in 1955.  Norelius and his beautiful 82 year old wife come to the Swimming Hall of Fame to receive daughter Martha's honoree award off an extended northern automobile trip in their Packard Clipper--now well into its second 100,000 miles.
 
Barry Roffer

Coach / Administrator
Inducted in 2012
Head Coach of the Three Village Swim Club for over 30 years … was Head Coach of the 18th World Maccabiah Games in Israel and was a member of the swimming staff for the 16th and 17th Games … was registrar for Metropolitan Swimming for over 20 years … coached all levels of swimmers up through Olympic Trials qualifiers ... tallied more than 50 Top 16 swimmers ... was New York State 100 yd Breaststroke champions in 1964 and 1965 ... was 7 time NAIA All-American and was named to the All Presidents Conference.
 
Ray Ruddy

Swimmer - NYAC
Inducted in 2005
Member of the 1928 US Olympic Team. Member of the 1932 and 1936 US Olympic Water Polo Team. Three time National Champion. NCAA Champion 440 yd Free swimming for Columbia.
 
Jack Ryan

Coach / Contributor USMA
Inducted in 2003
Coached USMA in West Point for 29 years. Career record of 363-177. in nearly 40 years of collegiate coaching. Member of the US Olympic Committee. President of College Swim Coaches Association. Chaired Men’s and Women’s NCAA Swimming and Diving Committees. Member of ISHOF Board of Directors. 26th recipient of Intercollegiate and Interscholastic Award. Meet director of 1972 NCAA Men’s division I Championships. Coached NCAA Division I and II Champions. Coached EISL,MAAC, and Senior Met Championship Teams. Made West Point facilities available to Metro athletes for Championship meets.
 
John Santos

Official
Inducted in 2013
Began officiating in 1954…has served on numerous local and national committees including the USS Olympiv/ Operating Committee…has officiated in meets ranging from the 1996 Olympics to the World University Games, Pan American Games, to free local meets at the Linden Street pool in Yonkers, NY...officiated internationally for the US in Columbia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Germany, France and Canada just to name a few...highly regarded starter on the local, regional and national level.
 
Julia Smit

Swimmer - Three Village Swim Club & Stanford University
Inducted in 2013
Set World Records and earned Gold Medals in the 200m and 400m IM at the 2009 Duel in the Pool…placed 4th in the 400m free relay and 6th in the 400m IM at the 2009 FINA World Championships…won the 200m IM at the 2009 National Championships…won the 200y IM and 400y IM and set American Records in both at the 2009 NCAA Championships...earned two medals(1 Silver abd 1 Bronze) at the 2008 Olympic Games in the 400m and 800m free relays...won five medals at the 2007 Pan American Games, four of them Gold. Further information on Julia is available at the USA Swimming web site.
 
Tobie Smith

Swimmer - Badger Swim Club & University of Texas
Inducted in 2007
Attended the University of Texas. 2 time National Champion. NCAA Champion in the 1650 Free. Several time NCAA All-American. Member of the 1991 Pan Pacific Team and the 1995 World University Games team. Open Water swimmer on the 1997 Pan Pacific and 1998 World University Games teams. World Champion 25K in 1998. 3 time Manhattan Island Swim Champion. Successful crossing of the English Channel in 1999 in under 9 hours.
 
Gerson Sobel

Masters Swimmer
Inducted in 2009
Current holder of 2 USMS Records. Has 19 number 1 and 37 top ten rankings since 1993. Named All-American in 11 years from 1986-present.
 
Aileen Riggen Soule

Swimmer
Inducted in 2000
1967 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD: OLYMPIC GAMES: 1920 gold (3m springboard), 5th (platform); 1924 silver (3m springboard), bronze (100m backstroke); NATIONAL AAU CHAMPIONSHIPS: 3 outdoor, 1 indoor (springboard; 400yd, 800m freestyle relay); turned pro in 1926, touring the world.
The youngest U.S. Olympic champion, the tiniest anywhere Olympic champion and the first women's Olympic springboard diving champion is Aileen Riggin.  All these honors were won in the 1920 Olympics by Miss Riggin when she had just passed her 14th birthday. The picture of her beside the N.Y.A.C. shotput champion as the "littlest and biggest Olympians" is a classic.
The question after a 14 year-old has this record should be, "but what could she do for an encore?"  She did it.  In the 1928 Olympics an 18 year old Miss Riggin was more rounded, was and is the only girl in Olympic history to win medals in both diving and swimming (silver in 3 meter springboard and bronze in 100 meter backstroke).  Nor were all of Miss Riggin's Olympian feats in Olympics.  She was high point woman (swimming and diving) in the U.S. National AAU Championship, won three outdoor, one indoor, national springboard titles, was part of two national 800 meter and one 400 yd. freestyle relay team winners for W.S.A., the New York club celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year, with Aileen Riggin a 1917 charter member.  Her relay teammates Hall of Famer Gertrude Ederle, Helen Wainwright, Ethel McGary, Doris O'Mara, Charlotte Boyle, Sybil Bauer and another great diver-swimmer Helen Meany.  She made the first underwater and the first slow-motion swimming and diving films for Grantland Rice in 1922 and 1923.
If no woman started earlier as an amateur champion, certainly no woman pro stayed on the top longer.  Aileen Riggin turned pro in 1926, played the Hippodrome 3 weeks, and toured with Ederle 6 months after her Channel swim.  She toured the world in 1930, including the Swedish World's Fair, worked steadily, including many Hollywood pictures, helped interview, organize and coach Billy Rose's first Aquacade in which she also starred, at the 1937 Cleveland Exposition.  Her articles appeared in Colliers, Good Housekeeping and other national magazines.
Aileen Riggin, still petite at 61, is now Mrs. Howard Soule, living in Honolulu.  No girl athlete in U.S. history has captured the hearts of her country so completely as she did in 1920.
 
Mary Ann Senecal

Administrator
Inducted in 2006
Began running swim meets in the early 1970’s; Metro secretary 1975-1979; Metro treasurer 1979-2005; Metro’s first computer operator; Co-Meet Director for the 1998 Northeast Junior Nationals; ran the computer for the Northeast Sectionals, National Catholic Collegiate Championships, the Big East Swimming Championships, and the Patriot League Championships.
 
Walter Spence

Swimmer - Brooklyn YMCA & NYAC
Inducted in 2002
19?? International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
Member of the 1928 and 1932 Canadian Olympic team. Bronze Medal 4x200m Free Relay. World Record Holder Back, Breast, and IM (3 stroke). Multiple time National Champion in Free, Back, and IM (3stroke). Swimming for Rutgers three time NCAA Champion 100yd Free and on time 400 Free Relay Champion. Member of International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF).
 
Cristina Teuscher

Swimmer - Badger Swim Club
Inducted in 2005
1996 Olympic Gold Medal 800 Free Relay; 2000 Olympic Bronze Medal 200 Individual Medley; 3-time Pan American Champion; 7-time US National Champion; 4-time NCAA Champion and All-American at Columbia University; 1999-2000 Honda Broderick Cup Award as the Outstanding Female Collegiate athlete; 13 Ivy League Championships in 8 events; still holds 6 Ivy League Records and 9 Senior Met Records.
 
Carin Cone Vandrbush

Swimmer
Inducted in 1999
1984 Ineternational Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer
FOR THE RECORD:  OLYMPIC GAMES: 1956 silver (100m backstroke); WORLD RECORDS: 7 (100m, 100yd, 220yd backstroke; 1 relay); PAN AMERICAN GAMES: 1959 gold (100m backstroke; medley relay); AAU NATIONALS: 16 (100yd, 110yd, 200yd, 220yd backstroke); AMERICAN RECORDS (Short Course): 10 (100yd, 150yd, 200yd backstroke); AMERICAN RECORDS (Long Course): 14 (100m, 200m 220m backstroke; 1 relay).
Carin Cone literally came on like a hurricane to win her first Senior National Championship in the 200yd backstroke.  It was at Philadelphia in the middle of a hurricane in August, 1955.  Two days later she won the 100 back, an event in which she continued undefeated in the Nationals, Indoor & Outdoor, for the next five years.  Her moment of greatest triumph and yet disappointment was at the 1956 Olympics where she and Judy Grinham (Great Britain) had identical times, and yet the judges picked Judy first.  Carin won 16 Nationals and set four World and 24 American records all in backstroke.  This "queen of backstrokers" in her time, like Eleanor Holm and Gloria Callen before her, and Lynne Burke afterwards, was also a cover girl supreme.  The four of them, all from the New York area, were on more magazine covers than four full-time models, which all were invited to be.  Carin had just two coaches in Marie Giardine at the Women's Swimming Association in New York and Phill Hansel at the University of Houston.  Perhaps Carin Cone's finest year was 1959 when she began by winning both women's backstroke titles at the Indoor AAU meet.  In July, Carin lowered her own World's Record in the 220yd backstroke, slicing more than three seconds from her 1956 time.  Two months later at the Pan American games in Chicago, Carin won the 100m backstroke title, and also established a world's record of 1:11.4 on the lead off backstroke leg in the medley relay.  She retired from competitive swimming in 1960.  In 1962 she married Al Vanderbush--Army's football co-captain and all-American guard.
games in Chicago, Carin won the 100m backstroke title, and also established a world's record of 1:11.4 on the lead off backstroke leg in the medley relay.  She retired from competitive swimming in 1960.  In 1962 she married Al Vanderbush--Army's football co-captain and all-American guard.
 
Elsie Viets Jennings

Administrator
Women's Swimming Association (WSA)
Inducted in 2008
Manager of the 1948 and 1952 US Olympic Team. Chaperone 1932 US Olympic Team.
 
Helen Wainwright

Swimmer / Diver
Inducted in 2001
1972 International Swimming Hall of Fame (ISHoF) Honor Swimmer / Diver
FOR THE RECORD:  OLYMPIC GAMES: 1920 silver (3m springboard); 1924 silver (400m freestyle); U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: 19 (2 diving; 17 swimming).
No swimmer other than Helen Wainwright has won an Olympic silver medal in diving as well as an Olympic silver medal in swimming.
This Miss Wainwright accomplished in Antwerp at the 1920 Olympics with a silver medal in the three meter springboard, and in Paris at the 1924 Olympics with a silver in the 400 meter freestyle.  Before, during, and after these two occasions, she won 19 gold medals as a U.S. National champion -- twice in diving and 17 times in swimming.  L. de B. Handley called her the world's fastest swimmer.  Helen won the Pentathlon designating her the top all-round U.S. woman swimmer.  Her Olympic (relay) and national gold medals were turned in to the government while her husband was overseas in World War II, but Helen Wainwright's silver and bronze Olympic and National medals are on display at the Hall of Fame.  Her golf and bowling talents were almost the equal of the swimming and diving talents of the All-American Girl.
In the words of her friend and Women's Swimming Association teammate Aileen Riggin, "We were the kids on the 1920 Olympic team, both barely 14.  Helen won the Olympic diving tryouts in New York where I was second, and I won in Amsterdam where she was second."
Helen Wainwright concentrated more on swimming later in her career, and she was the original selection to try the English Channel.  She pulled a muscle and her teammate Gertrude Ederle was chosen to go in Helen Wainwright's place.
Prior to Gertrude Ederle's immortal channel swim, all three of the 1924 Olympians, Wainwright, Riggin and Ederle played the famed Hippodrome and then after the Channel, toured the USA playing the biggest theaters with a portable tank.
 
John Witchell

Swimmer
Inducted in 2002
Member of the 1986 US Goodwill Games Team Gold Medal 200m Free. American Record Holder 200m Free (SC). Member of the Pan American, Pan Pacific, and Maccabiah Teams. NCAA Champion 500yd Free. Senior National Finalist. Junior National Champion at age 15.
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